Snake In Mouth Panel |

Moab North

Hiking Snake In Mouth Panel - Moab North Hiking Snake In Mouth Panel
Moab North

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Overview

RATING: Easy Hike

Mon

82 | 52

Tue

81 | 50

Wed

83 | 52

Thu

82 | 54

Fri

79 | 55

View Full Weather Details
SEASON: Any, hot in summer.
GEAR: Standard Hiking Gear
WATER: None.

Mon

82 | 52

Tue

81 | 50

Wed

83 | 52

Thu

82 | 54

Fri

79 | 55

View Full Weather Details
The overhang where the panel is located.

The overhang where the panel is located.

Snakes are one of the oldest and most represented figures in mythologies of groups around the world. It is easy to see with their unique shape, movement, steely eyes, and diversity of colors how snakes have been embedded in so many peoples folklore and myths. Depending on the people and the time, the snake could represent good, evil, or the duality of both at once. In the Hopi Indians, for instance, snakes represented fertility.

Though many rock art sites I have seen in southern Utah have snakes represented in one form or another in them, this is the first I have seen where a snake is depicted in a mouth. Could this have described someone who spoke evil? Or perhaps it represents a person whose spirit was thought to have been a snake? It is interesting to speculate, and a fascinating panel to visit.

Note: The panel is visible from a distance with binoculars or a telephoto lens, but reaching the panel requires a bit of scrambling. The scrambling has exposure and is more difficult on the way down. Experienced desert scramblers only! On our trip, the only dry route was on the left side of the overhang and easy 5th class. When dry, other 4th class or easy 5th class routes are options directly under the overhang. Choose your path wisely and make sure it is within your ability!

Snakes are one of the oldest and most represented figures in mythologies of groups around the world. It is easy to see with their unique shape, movement, steely eyes, and diversity of colors how snakes have been embedded in so many peoples folklore and myths. Depending on the people and the time, the snake could represent good, evil, or the duality of both at once. In the Hopi Indians, for instance, snakes represented fertility.

Though many rock art sites I have seen in southern Utah have snakes represented in one form or another in them, this is the first I have seen where a snake is depicted in a mouth. Could this have described someone who spoke evil? Or perhaps it represents a person whose spirit was thought to have been a snake? It is interesting to speculate, and a fascinating panel to visit.

Note: The panel is visible from a distance with binoculars or a telephoto lens, but reaching the panel requires a bit of scrambling. The scrambling has exposure and is more difficult on the way down. Experienced desert scramblers only! On our trip, the only dry route was on the left side of the overhang and easy 5th class. When dry, other 4th class or easy 5th class routes are options directly under the overhang. Choose your path wisely and make sure it is within your ability!
Another view of the panel

Another view of the panel

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