Old Limber Pine Trail |

Logan Canyon

Hiking Old Limber Pine Trail - Logan Canyon Hiking Old Limber Pine Trail
Logan Canyon

Overview | Getting There | Route | Photos | Maps | Comments

Overview

RATING: Easy Hike

Fri

66 | 52

Sat

70 | 46

Sun

75 | 50

Mon

72 | 52

Tue

72 | 47

View Full Weather Details
SEASON: Spring, Summer, Fall
GEAR: Standard Hiking Gear
WATER: None.

Fri

66 | 52

Sat

70 | 46

Sun

75 | 50

Mon

72 | 52

Tue

72 | 47

View Full Weather Details
Old Limber Pine

Old Limber Pine

Limber Pine is a coniferous tree that is symbolic of the Rocky Mountains. The trees can grow tall, up to 40-50 feet, but tend to be twisted and gnarled. Limber Pine was one of the major resources early settlers utilized when settling in the Rocky Mountains. They used the abundant tree for cabins, fencing, mining timbers, firewood, etc. I cannot imagine trying to build a cabin with such a gnarled and twisted lumber!

The Limber Pine trail in Logan Canyon is a family friendly hike to visit one of these iconic old trees. The hike, a bit over a mile, is on a wide and well-trodden trail. It is suitable for most and seems especially popular with families. It is a lovely hike, meandering through a mostly shaded path to the tree, then meandering back to the trailhead making a loop. We last visited on a sweltering day, and the shade of the trees made it surprisingly pleasant. This hike makes a great side trip if you are in Bear Lake for the weekend and wanting to get up a bit in elevation and stretch your legs. Informational signs along the trail make it even more interesting.

Looking into the Sinks from the Old Limber Pine Trail

Looking into the Sinks from the Old Limber Pine Trail

Getting There

The trailhead is at milepost 491.25 on US-89. This is about 33 miles east of Logan up Logan Canyon, or about 7 miles west of Garden City near Bear Lake. The trailhead is on the south side of the road and has a large parking area and pit toilet.

A glimpse of Bear Lake from the trail.

A glimpse of Bear Lake from the trail.

Route

From the trailhead, the trail leaves the south side of the parking lot and quickly forks a minute or two from the parking lot. The trail is a loop, and through you could travel it in either direction, everyone we saw preferred counterclockwise. Go right at the junction.

The trail meanders along, gaining a little elevation before the trees open and you can get a view west into the Sinks. The Sinks are an area of geological low points in the limestone making up the wide-open valley. This area is known to have some of the coldest temperatures in Utah. On Feb. 1, 1985, the second coldest temperature ever recorded in the lower 48 states was recorded here, a very chilly -69.3°F!

Continuing, the trail soon reaches the namesake Limber Pine. This 560-year-old tree is immense in its stature and neat to behold.

The Limber Pine marks about the halfway point, and the trail begins heading north back to the parking lot with an occasional view of Bear Lake to the east.


Maps

Route / 1.66 miles / Elevation Range 7,786 - 7,933 ft.
Printable Maps:
Trailhead

12T 460873mE 4641564mN

N41° 55' 30" W111° 28' 19"

Limber Pine

12T 460641mE 4640958mN

N41° 55' 11" W111° 28' 29"

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